“Caster Adjustments for Maximum Performance”

Caster helps the car to self-center itself to a much greater degree than the scrub radius. By properly adjusting caster, the car will “want to” go in certain directions. Rarely are both front wheels adjusted to the same exact caster setting. Instead, there is a slight difference in caster, causing a condition known as caster stagger
Caster settings depend on how much you want the car to try to self-center itself or self-steer itself. The larger the positive caster angle, the more the car will want to self-center itself. The larger the caster stagger, the more the car will want to self-steer.

Compare the center of the wheel contact patch and the centerline of the axis of the rotation of the ball joints in the spindle. They are quite different. If the axis of rotation of the ball joints intersects the ground in front of the center of the tire contact patch, caster is positive. If the axis of rotation of the ball joints intersects the ground in back of the center of the tire contact patch, caster is negative.

Caster angle settings depend on the type of track that you are running. Generally speaking, keep caster angles low with no more than two degrees of caster stagger. Any more than that and the contact patch will not be consistent through the turn. Low caster angles will provide more control by limiting the car’s ability to self-steer or self-center itself!

Mike Loescher is the owner and chief instructor at FinishLine Racing School in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Mike holds Chassis Seminars throughout the year - all around the USA & Canada. View our class schedule or call 386-427-8522 to schedule a private setup date.



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